Alphabet tracing free download

August 25, 2021 / Rating: 4.9 / Views: 885

Gallery of Images "Alphabet tracing free download" (50 pics):

"file not found" firewox word download

Eine Liste der unterstützten URL-Protokolle, die Fähigkeiten der verschiedenen Wrapper, Hinweise zu deren Verwendung und Informationen zu den eventuell vorhandenen vordefinierten Variablen finden Sie unter Unterstützte Protokolle und Wrapper. Just a note for those who face problems on names containing spaces (e.g. In the examples (99% of the time) you can findheader('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename='.basename($file));but the correct way to set the filename is quoting it (double quote):header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="'.basename($file).'"' ); Some browsers may work without quotation, but for sure not Firefox and as Mozilla explains, the quotation of the filename in the content-disposition is according to the RFC To avoid errors, just be careful whether slash "/" is allowed or not at the beginning of $file_name parameter. In my case, trying to send PDF files thru PHP after access-logging,the beginning "/" must be removed in PHP 7.1. Always using MIME-Type 'application/octet-stream' is not optimal. Most if not all browsers will simply download files with that type. If you use proper MIME types (and inline Content-Disposition), browsers will have better default actions for some of them. in case of images, browsers will display them, which is probably what you'd want. To deliver the file with the proper MIME type, the easiest way is to use:header('Content-Type: ' . mime_content_type($file)); header('Content-Disposition: inline; filename="'.basename($file).'"'); To avoid the risk of choosing themselves which files to download by messing with the request and doing things like inserting "../" into the "filename", simply remember that URLs are not file paths, and there's no reason why the mapping between them has to be so literal as "download.php? file=thingy.mpg" resulting in the download of the file "thingy.mpg". It's your script and you have full control over how it maps file requests to file names, and which requests retrieve which files. But even then, as ever, never trust ANYTHING in the request. Basic first-day-at-school security principle, that. To anyone that's had problems with Readfile() reading large files into memory the problem is not Readfile() itself, it's because you have output buffering on. Just turn off output buffering immediately before the call to Readfile(). It can be slow for big files to read by fread, but this is a single way to read file in strict bounds. You can modify this and add fpassthru instead of fread and while, but it sends all data from begin --- it would be not fruitful if request is bytes from 100 to 200 from 100mb file. A note on the smart Read File function from gaosipov: Change the indexes on the preg_match matches to: $begin = intval($matches[1]); if( ! empty($matches[2]) ) Otherwise the $begin would be set to the entire section matched and the $end to what should be the begin. If you are lucky enough to not be on shared hosting and have apache, look at installing mod_xsendfile. This was the only way I found to both protect and transfer very large files with PHP (gigabytes). It's also proved to be much faster for basically any file. Available directives have changed since the other note on this and XSend File Allow Above was replaced with XSend File Path to allow more control over access to files outside of webroot. Install with: apxs -cia mod_xsendfile.c Add the appropriate configuration directives to your .htaccess or files:# Turn it on XSend File on# Whitelist a target directory. XSend File Path /tmp/blah Then to use it in your script: In response to flowbee@-- When using the readfile_chunked function noted here with files larger than 10MB or so I am still having memory errors. It's because the writers have left out the all important flush() after each read. So this is the proper chunked readfile (which isn't really readfile at all, and should probably be crossposted to passthru(), fopen(), and popen() just so browsers can find this information): com shared "readfile_chunked" function. It does work, but you may encounter memory exhaustion using "fread". Meanwhile "stream_copy_to_stream" seems to utilize the same amount of memory as "readfile". At least, when I was testing "download" function for my https://github.com/Simbiat/HTTP20 library on 1.5G file with 256M memory limitation that was the case: "fread" I got peak memory usage of ~240M, while with "stream_copy_to_stream" - ~150M. It does not mean that you can fully escape memory exhaustion, though: if you are reading too much at a time, you can still encounter it. That is why in my library I use a helper function ("speed Limit") to calculate whether selected speed limit will fit the available memory (while allowing some headroom). You can read comments in the code itself for more details and raise issues for the library, if you think something is incorrect there (especially since it's WIP at the moment of writing this), but so far I am able to get consistent behavior with it. If you are looking for an algorithm that will allow you to download (force download) a big file, may this one will help you.$filename = "file.csv";$filepath = "/path/to/file/" . $filename;// Close sessions to prevent user from waiting until // download will finish (uncomment if needed)//session_write_close();set_time_limit(0);ignore_user_abort(false);ini_set('output_buffering', 0);ini_set('zlib.output_compression', 0);$chunk = 10 * 1024 * 1024; // bytes per chunk (10 MB)$fh = fopen($filepath, "rb");if ($fh === false) header('Content-Description: File Transfer');header('Content-Type: application/octet-stream');header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="' . '"'); header('Expires: 0');header('Cache-Control: must-revalidate');header('Pragma: public');header('Content-Length: ' . filesize($filepath));// Repeat reading until EOFwhile (! feof($fh)) exit; Using pieces of the forced download script, adding in My SQL database functions, and hiding the file location for security was what we needed for downloading wmv files from our members creations without prompting Media player as well as secure the file itself and use only database queries. Something to the effect below, very customizable for private access, remote files, and keeping order of your online media. Of course you need to setup the DB, table, and columns. Email me for Full setup// Session marker is also a security/logging option Used in the context of linking: id=xx&hit=1 [Edited by sp@php.net: Added Protection against SQL-Injection] I have noticed some unusual behavior with Internet Explorer 6 that’s worth taking note of. I have a link on my site to a script that outputs an XML file to the browser with the below code:header('Content-Type: application/octet-stream');header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="'.$filename.'"');@readfile($file); When the popular IE setting “Reuse Window for Launching Shortcuts” is unchecked (access this setting in the Tools Menu Advanced Tab) this script will output the file to the browser and open it in a different window if the user clicks the open button on the IE prompt. However, if this setting is checked, and browser windows are being re-used, then it will open up on top of the page where the link was clicked to access the script. If I instead set the html link target option to be “_blank”, the script will open up in a new window as expected if the “Reuse Window for Launching Shortcuts” is checked. But, if the setting is unchecked, the output XML file will open up in a new window and there will be another blank window also open that has the address of the script, in addition to our original window. This is far from ideal, and there is no way of knowing whether users have this option checked or not. We are stuck with the distinct possibility of half of our visitors seeing either an annoying third blank window being opened or the script writing over their original window, depending on their “Reuse Window for Launching Shortcuts” setting. To reduce the burden on the server, you might want to output "Etag" and/or "Last-Modified" on http response header. But there are some headers, which PHP itself outputs automatically, disturbing this. If you guys know how to judge the return values of function "stat", in order to avoid using "is_file" or "is_readable" (or "is_dir"), please let me know or just write it here. If you don't have to do anything special on 404, "header('HTTP/1.x xxx xxxxx');" can be inside of the function. Remember if you make a "force download" script like mentioned below that you SANITIZE YOUR INPUT! I have seen a lot of download scripts that does not test so you are able to download anything you want on the server. Test especially for strings like ".." which makes directory traversal possible. If possible only permit characters a-z, A-Z and 0-9 and make it possible to only download from one "download-folder". I think that readfile suffers from the maximum script execution time. The readfile is always completed even if it exceed the default 30 seconds limit, then the script is aborted. Be warned that you can get very odd behaviour not only on large files, but also on small files if the user has a slow connection. The best thing to do is to use here is a nice force download scirpt $filename = 'dummy.zip'; $filename = realpath($filename); $file_extension = strtolower(substr(strrchr($filename,"."),1)); switch ($file_extension) if (! file_exists($filename)) header("Pragma: public"); header("Expires: 0"); header("Cache-Control: must-revalidate, post-check=0, pre-check=0"); header("Cache-Control: private",false); header("Content-Type: $ctype"); header("Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=\"".basename($filename)."\";"); header("Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary"); header("Content-Length: ".@filesize($filename)); set_time_limit(0); @readfile("$filename") or die("File not found."); If you are using the procedures outlined in this article to force sending a file to a user, you may find that the "Content-Length" header is not being sent on some servers. The reason this occurs is because some servers are setup by default to enable gzip compression, which sends an additional header for such operations. This additional header is "Transfer-Encoding: chunked" which essentially overrides the "Content-Length" header and forces a chunked download. Of course, this is not required if you are using the intelligent versions of readfile in this article. A missing Content-Length header implies the following:1) Your browser will not show a progress bar on downloads because it doesn't know their length2) If you output anything (e.g. white space) after the readfile function (by mistake), the browser will add that to the end of the download, resulting in corrupt data. The easiest way to disable this behaviour is with the following .htaccess directive. Set Env no-gzip dont-vary Beware - the chunky readfile suggested by Rob Funk can easily exceed you maximum script execution time (30 seconds by default). I suggest you to use the set_time_limit function inside the while loop to reset the php watchdog. To use readfile() it is absolutely necessary to set the mime-type before. If you are using an Apache, it's quite simple to figure out the correct mime type. Apache has a file called "mime.types" which can (in normal case) be read by all users. Use this (or another) function to get a list of mime-types: In reply to herbert dot fischer at NOSPAM dot gmail dot com: The streams API in PHP5 tries to make things as efficient as possible; in php-5.1.6 on Linux, fpassthru is faster than 'echo fread($fp, 8192)' in a loop, and readfile is even faster for files on disk. I didn't benchmark further, but I'd be willing to bet non-mmap'able streams still win because they can loop in C instead of PHP. I wasted days trying to figure this out before I found the problem was easily solved. I'm sure many of you out there have had similar problem when trying to use readfile to output images with a php file as the "src" of a "img" tag. It works fine "as is" in Firefox but not in IE, Safari or g. I found hundreds of results on google all saying things like "there must be white space at the end of you code", "you need this header or that header". I couldn't believe what the solution was but here it is anyway! Remove the "Width" and "Height" attributes from your "img" tag In response to "grey - greywyvern - com": If you know the target _can't_ be a remote file (e.g. prefixing it with a directory), you should use include instead. If the user manages to set the target to some kinda config-file (in Joomla! ), he will get a blank page - unless readfile() is used. I was trying to use readfile in IE8 and kept getting the message "failed to get data for 'type'". Using include will just behave as a normal request (no output). Eventually figured out the problem was that I had Leech Get installed and it was intercepting the download, which in turn prevented the download from taking place. Eine Liste der unterstützten URL-Protokolle, die Fähigkeiten der verschiedenen Wrapper, Hinweise zu deren Verwendung und Informationen zu den eventuell vorhandenen vordefinierten Variablen finden Sie unter Unterstützte Protokolle und Wrapper. Just a note for those who face problems on names containing spaces (e.g. In the examples (99% of the time) you can findheader('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename='.basename($file));but the correct way to set the filename is quoting it (double quote):header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="'.basename($file).'"' ); Some browsers may work without quotation, but for sure not Firefox and as Mozilla explains, the quotation of the filename in the content-disposition is according to the RFC To avoid errors, just be careful whether slash "/" is allowed or not at the beginning of $file_name parameter. In my case, trying to send PDF files thru PHP after access-logging,the beginning "/" must be removed in PHP 7.1. Always using MIME-Type 'application/octet-stream' is not optimal. Most if not all browsers will simply download files with that type. If you use proper MIME types (and inline Content-Disposition), browsers will have better default actions for some of them. in case of images, browsers will display them, which is probably what you'd want. To deliver the file with the proper MIME type, the easiest way is to use:header('Content-Type: ' . mime_content_type($file)); header('Content-Disposition: inline; filename="'.basename($file).'"'); To avoid the risk of choosing themselves which files to download by messing with the request and doing things like inserting "../" into the "filename", simply remember that URLs are not file paths, and there's no reason why the mapping between them has to be so literal as "download.php? file=thingy.mpg" resulting in the download of the file "thingy.mpg". It's your script and you have full control over how it maps file requests to file names, and which requests retrieve which files. But even then, as ever, never trust ANYTHING in the request. Basic first-day-at-school security principle, that. To anyone that's had problems with Readfile() reading large files into memory the problem is not Readfile() itself, it's because you have output buffering on. Just turn off output buffering immediately before the call to Readfile(). It can be slow for big files to read by fread, but this is a single way to read file in strict bounds. You can modify this and add fpassthru instead of fread and while, but it sends all data from begin --- it would be not fruitful if request is bytes from 100 to 200 from 100mb file. A note on the smart Read File function from gaosipov: Change the indexes on the preg_match matches to: $begin = intval($matches[1]); if( ! empty($matches[2]) ) Otherwise the $begin would be set to the entire section matched and the $end to what should be the begin. If you are lucky enough to not be on shared hosting and have apache, look at installing mod_xsendfile. This was the only way I found to both protect and transfer very large files with PHP (gigabytes). It's also proved to be much faster for basically any file. Available directives have changed since the other note on this and XSend File Allow Above was replaced with XSend File Path to allow more control over access to files outside of webroot. Install with: apxs -cia mod_xsendfile.c Add the appropriate configuration directives to your .htaccess or files:# Turn it on XSend File on# Whitelist a target directory. XSend File Path /tmp/blah Then to use it in your script: In response to flowbee@-- When using the readfile_chunked function noted here with files larger than 10MB or so I am still having memory errors. It's because the writers have left out the all important flush() after each read. So this is the proper chunked readfile (which isn't really readfile at all, and should probably be crossposted to passthru(), fopen(), and popen() just so browsers can find this information): com shared "readfile_chunked" function. It does work, but you may encounter memory exhaustion using "fread". Meanwhile "stream_copy_to_stream" seems to utilize the same amount of memory as "readfile". At least, when I was testing "download" function for my https://github.com/Simbiat/HTTP20 library on 1.5G file with 256M memory limitation that was the case: "fread" I got peak memory usage of ~240M, while with "stream_copy_to_stream" - ~150M. It does not mean that you can fully escape memory exhaustion, though: if you are reading too much at a time, you can still encounter it. That is why in my library I use a helper function ("speed Limit") to calculate whether selected speed limit will fit the available memory (while allowing some headroom). You can read comments in the code itself for more details and raise issues for the library, if you think something is incorrect there (especially since it's WIP at the moment of writing this), but so far I am able to get consistent behavior with it. If you are looking for an algorithm that will allow you to download (force download) a big file, may this one will help you.$filename = "file.csv";$filepath = "/path/to/file/" . $filename;// Close sessions to prevent user from waiting until // download will finish (uncomment if needed)//session_write_close();set_time_limit(0);ignore_user_abort(false);ini_set('output_buffering', 0);ini_set('zlib.output_compression', 0);$chunk = 10 * 1024 * 1024; // bytes per chunk (10 MB)$fh = fopen($filepath, "rb");if ($fh === false) header('Content-Description: File Transfer');header('Content-Type: application/octet-stream');header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="' . '"'); header('Expires: 0');header('Cache-Control: must-revalidate');header('Pragma: public');header('Content-Length: ' . filesize($filepath));// Repeat reading until EOFwhile (! feof($fh)) exit; Using pieces of the forced download script, adding in My SQL database functions, and hiding the file location for security was what we needed for downloading wmv files from our members creations without prompting Media player as well as secure the file itself and use only database queries. Something to the effect below, very customizable for private access, remote files, and keeping order of your online media. Of course you need to setup the DB, table, and columns. Email me for Full setup// Session marker is also a security/logging option Used in the context of linking: id=xx&hit=1 [Edited by sp@php.net: Added Protection against SQL-Injection] I have noticed some unusual behavior with Internet Explorer 6 that’s worth taking note of. I have a link on my site to a script that outputs an XML file to the browser with the below code:header('Content-Type: application/octet-stream');header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="'.$filename.'"');@readfile($file); When the popular IE setting “Reuse Window for Launching Shortcuts” is unchecked (access this setting in the Tools Menu Advanced Tab) this script will output the file to the browser and open it in a different window if the user clicks the open button on the IE prompt. However, if this setting is checked, and browser windows are being re-used, then it will open up on top of the page where the link was clicked to access the script. If I instead set the html link target option to be “_blank”, the script will open up in a new window as expected if the “Reuse Window for Launching Shortcuts” is checked. But, if the setting is unchecked, the output XML file will open up in a new window and there will be another blank window also open that has the address of the script, in addition to our original window. This is far from ideal, and there is no way of knowing whether users have this option checked or not. We are stuck with the distinct possibility of half of our visitors seeing either an annoying third blank window being opened or the script writing over their original window, depending on their “Reuse Window for Launching Shortcuts” setting. To reduce the burden on the server, you might want to output "Etag" and/or "Last-Modified" on http response header. But there are some headers, which PHP itself outputs automatically, disturbing this. If you guys know how to judge the return values of function "stat", in order to avoid using "is_file" or "is_readable" (or "is_dir"), please let me know or just write it here. If you don't have to do anything special on 404, "header('HTTP/1.x xxx xxxxx');" can be inside of the function. Remember if you make a "force download" script like mentioned below that you SANITIZE YOUR INPUT! I have seen a lot of download scripts that does not test so you are able to download anything you want on the server. Test especially for strings like ".." which makes directory traversal possible. If possible only permit characters a-z, A-Z and 0-9 and make it possible to only download from one "download-folder". I think that readfile suffers from the maximum script execution time. The readfile is always completed even if it exceed the default 30 seconds limit, then the script is aborted. Be warned that you can get very odd behaviour not only on large files, but also on small files if the user has a slow connection. The best thing to do is to use here is a nice force download scirpt $filename = 'dummy.zip'; $filename = realpath($filename); $file_extension = strtolower(substr(strrchr($filename,"."),1)); switch ($file_extension) if (! file_exists($filename)) header("Pragma: public"); header("Expires: 0"); header("Cache-Control: must-revalidate, post-check=0, pre-check=0"); header("Cache-Control: private",false); header("Content-Type: $ctype"); header("Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=\"".basename($filename)."\";"); header("Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary"); header("Content-Length: ".@filesize($filename)); set_time_limit(0); @readfile("$filename") or die("File not found."); If you are using the procedures outlined in this article to force sending a file to a user, you may find that the "Content-Length" header is not being sent on some servers. The reason this occurs is because some servers are setup by default to enable gzip compression, which sends an additional header for such operations. This additional header is "Transfer-Encoding: chunked" which essentially overrides the "Content-Length" header and forces a chunked download. Of course, this is not required if you are using the intelligent versions of readfile in this article. A missing Content-Length header implies the following:1) Your browser will not show a progress bar on downloads because it doesn't know their length2) If you output anything (e.g. white space) after the readfile function (by mistake), the browser will add that to the end of the download, resulting in corrupt data. The easiest way to disable this behaviour is with the following .htaccess directive. Set Env no-gzip dont-vary Beware - the chunky readfile suggested by Rob Funk can easily exceed you maximum script execution time (30 seconds by default). I suggest you to use the set_time_limit function inside the while loop to reset the php watchdog. To use readfile() it is absolutely necessary to set the mime-type before. If you are using an Apache, it's quite simple to figure out the correct mime type. Apache has a file called "mime.types" which can (in normal case) be read by all users. Use this (or another) function to get a list of mime-types: In reply to herbert dot fischer at NOSPAM dot gmail dot com: The streams API in PHP5 tries to make things as efficient as possible; in php-5.1.6 on Linux, fpassthru is faster than 'echo fread($fp, 8192)' in a loop, and readfile is even faster for files on disk. I didn't benchmark further, but I'd be willing to bet non-mmap'able streams still win because they can loop in C instead of PHP. I wasted days trying to figure this out before I found the problem was easily solved. I'm sure many of you out there have had similar problem when trying to use readfile to output images with a php file as the "src" of a "img" tag. It works fine "as is" in Firefox but not in IE, Safari or g. I found hundreds of results on google all saying things like "there must be white space at the end of you code", "you need this header or that header". I couldn't believe what the solution was but here it is anyway! Remove the "Width" and "Height" attributes from your "img" tag In response to "grey - greywyvern - com": If you know the target _can't_ be a remote file (e.g. prefixing it with a directory), you should use include instead. If the user manages to set the target to some kinda config-file (in Joomla! ), he will get a blank page - unless readfile() is used. I was trying to use readfile in IE8 and kept getting the message "failed to get data for 'type'". Using include will just behave as a normal request (no output). Eventually figured out the problem was that I had Leech Get installed and it was intercepting the download, which in turn prevented the download from taking place.

date: 25-Aug-2021 22:02next


2020-2021 © d.free-online-arcade-games.com
Sitemap